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Newspaper Archive of
Tyler Tribute
Tyler, Minnesota
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October 18, 2017     Tyler Tribute
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October 18, 2017
 

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017 Tyler Tribute - Page 9 Balaton Press Tribune - There were around 150 people in attendance at the annual Fire Prevention Breakfast on Sunday, Sept. 8. All proceeds went to the Balaton Fire Department Relief Association. The Edgerton Enterprise - City Clerk Michael Vander Haar reported at a recent city council meeting that ev- erything is on track for the city's ap- plication for a rural development loan to pay for the future connection to Lincoln Pipestone Rural Water. Hendricks Pioneer - Two Minnesota Vikings cheerleaders visited with fans and signed autographs during Hen- dricks HarvestFest Saturday, Oct. 7. Ivanhoe Times - Divine Providence Health Center-Nursing Home in Ivan- hoe is celebrating 50 years of ser- vice and is inviting you to join them Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2-4 p.m. to cel- ebrate with cake and refreshments. Lake Benton Valley Journal - The Elk- ton-Lake Benton High School March- ing Band earned a gold plaque at the NSU Gypsy Days Marching Band Com- petition on Saturday, Sept. 30. Minneota Mascot- Minneota graduates Steve Sussner and Mike Dalager are in the process of buying out their part- ner, Chad Wyffels, at Borch's Sporting Goods in Marshall. Wyffels plans to continue working there for a few more years, but is looking to lessen his work load as president of Borch's. Murray County News - The Slayton Veterinary Medical Center recently chose Murray County Central FFA as the recipient of a $625 donation from Zoetis. The donation will go toward the purchase of new study materials, FFA Career Development Events, and registration fees when attending con- tests. Pipestone County Star - Traditional harmless homecoming pranks went too far last week in Pipestone. With multiple reports of vandalism and one incident of vandalism that included hate speech, an investigation is un- derway and charges are pending for at least one person. Tracy Headlight Herald -A few Tracy residents attended last week's City Council meeting to address the coun- cil with their concerns of the council's possible violations of city ordinances and conflicts of interest. I Photo by Shelly Finzen Lions Club Benefit presented to Tragesers Luann and Lyle Wiese of the Lake Benton Lions Club, left, presented a check for $4,500 to Ralph and Jolene Trageser. Both Tragesers have been battling cancer. Jolene's is in remission while Ralph's treatments are ongoing. Oct. 1--At 2:12 p.m., 22- year-old Randall Toshiro Tanaka of Hopkins was stopped in Hope Township and issued a citation for Speed. At 10:04 p.m., 18-year- old Blaid Joseph Friedrichs of Mankato was stopped in Hope Township and issued a citation for speed. Oct. 2--At 7:57 p.m., 28-year-old Andrew Er- nest Warner of Lucan was stopped in Hendricks Township and issued a ci- tation for speed. At 9:50 p.m., 59-year- old Stanley George Charg- ing of Crystal was stopped in Lake Benton Township and issued a citation for speed. Oct. 3--At 3:45 a.m., re- ceived a report of a barn fire in Marble Township. The Lincoln County Sher- iff's Office, Hendricks Fire Department and Ivanhoe Ambulance responded and the fire was extinguished. 'Th'ere were no injuries. At 9:27 a.m., the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office re- ceived a report of a theft in Lake Benton. The Lake Benton Police Department is currently investigating the matter. At 9:42 p.m., the Lin- coln County Sheriff's Of- fice received a report of a possible domestic dispute in Lake Benton. The Lake Benton Police Department responded and the situa- tion was resolved. Oct. 4--At 8:45 a.m., received a report of a two- vehicle accident in Verdi Township. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office responded to the scene. There were no injuries. At 11 p.m., received a re- port of a theft in Lake Ben- ton. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office responded and the Lake Benton Po- lice Department is investi- gating the matter. Oct. 6--At 2:36 p.m., received a report of a bur- glary in Hansonville Town- ship. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office responded and is investigating the matter. At 4:14 p.m., received a report of a two-vehicle ac- Sheriff's Report From the Lincoln County Sheriff's Department cident in Lake Benton. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Lake Benton First Responders and Tyler Am- bulance responded to the scene. The occupants of both vehicles were treated for unknown injuries. Oct. 7--At 7:40 a.m., received a report of a ve- hicle that had been rum- maged through and some items that had been taken in Hendricks. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office re- sponded and is currently investigating the incident. At 11:05 p.m., received several reports of a fight in the alley behind the bar in Lake Benton. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, Lake Benton Police De- partment and Tyler Police Department responded to the scene and the fight was resolved. At 11:16 p.m., received a report of an individual dis- turbing the peace in Arco. The Lincoln County Sher- iff's Office responded and handled the matter. Oct. 8--At 2:17 a.m., re- ceived a report of an argu- ment in Arco. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office re- sponded and the incident was resolved. At 9:44 a.m., received a report of an individual at- tempting to steal license plates off of a vehicle in Marshfield Township. The Tyler Police Department and Lincoln County Sher- iff's Office responded and as a result, 21-year-old Moises Reyes of Florence was arrested and charged in the matter. Oct. 9--At 8:08 a.m., the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office received a report of a vehicle that had been rummaged through and some items that had been taken out of it in Tyler. The Tyler Police Department responded and is investi- gating the matter. At 9:13 a.m. and 4:16 p.m., received two more reports of vehicles that had been gone through and money and other items taken from both. The Tyler Police Department is investigating. Oct. lO--At 12:42 p.m., the Lincoln County Sher- iff's Office received a re- port of some suspicious activity in Tyler. The Ty- ler Police Department re- sponded and handled the matter. Oct. 12--At 2:41 p.m., 55-year-old Troy Ken- neth DenHerder of Val- ley Springs, South Dakota was stopped in Drammen Township and issued a ci- tation for speed. Oct. 13--At 7:31 p.m., 18-year-old Madelyn Lee Geurts of Marshall was stopped in Verdi Township and issued a citation for speed. At 8:01 p.m., 20-year- old MaCoy Laverne Schwi- erjohann of Geneva was stopped in Verdi Township and issued a citation for speed. Oct. 14--At 12:56 a.m., received a report of some suspicious activity in Roy- al Township. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and Minnesota State Patrol responded and as a re- sult, 32-year-old Anthony James Giroux of Troy, Texas was arrested and charged with DWI. At 6:03 p.m., the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office received a report of a mi- nor, two-vehicle accident in Tyler. The Tyler Police Department responded. There were no injuries. Oct. 15-At 1:56 p.m., re- ceived a report of a theft in Marshfield Township. The Lincoln County Sheriff's Office is investigating. At 5:19 p.m., the Lincoln County Sheriff's Office re- ceived a report of a theft in Ivanhoe. The informa- tion was passed along to the Ivanhoe Police Depart- ment for investigation. Oct. 16--At 6:17 p.m., the Lincoln County Sher- iff's Office was made aware of some damage to property in Tyler. The Ty- ler Police Department is currently investigating the incident. Retiring abroad? What you need to know about getting benefits overseas Retiring outside of the United States can be an exciting way to spend your golden years. Perhaps re- tirement in Poland or Peru is in your plans. In many cases, it's possible to re- ceive your Social Security retirement benefits while living abroad. Our website can help you navigate your benefit eligibility while liv- ing overseas. If you've worked in both the United States and an- other country, it may be possible for your credits to combine for a larger bene- fit. Currently, there are 25 countries with such inter- national agreements with the United States. To find out if you have qualifying work in a country with such an agreement, visit Social Security News By Cristina Powell, District Manager www.socialsecurity.gov/ international. You can receive benefits in many countries. To find out whether you can re- ceive your benefits in the country where you are re- tiring, you should use our Payments Abroad Screen- ing Tool at www.socialse- curity.gov/internationai/ payments outsideUS.html. There are easy ways to get in touch with us and report changes to Social Security when you live overseas. You can contact your local U.S. embassy, write to us by mail, or call us at 1-800-772-1213. You can find other information in regards to living over- seas at www.socialsecu- rity, gov/foreign. Social Security is with you throughout life's jour- ney, even if that journey takes you outside the Unit- ed States. You can always access our wide range of safe and secure online re- sources at www.socialse- curity.gov. Irting abuse of vulnerable adults In southern Minnesota, a woman who was pre- viously suspended from the practice of law was appointed as a guardian for dozens of vulnerable adults. In one case, she drained over $22,000 from a ward's bank accounts and left him to live in squa- lor, with no food. She was convicted of several felo- nies after she financially exploited her wards out of tens of thousands of dol- lars while ignoring their needs. A woman in western Minnesota left a vulner- able adult $18,500 in debt after spending money from his trust. The victim? Her son. In northern Minnesota, a health care worker di- verted her elderly parents' monthly long-term care payments, leaving them with a $150,000 debt to their care center. To pay the debt, the woman sold her parents' farm land without their knowledge or permission. Unfortunately, cases like these are not rare. People with disabili- ties are victimized at high rates compared to the gen- eral population. They are sometimes targeted specif- ically because of their dis- abilities. A person with a disability is up to ten times more likely to be abused than a person without a disability. In one survey, over 70 percent of people with disabilities reported having been abused. Compared with the gen- eral population, people with disabilities are more likely to be abused by a caregiver or someone they know and more likely to remain in an abusive situ- ation. They are sometimes repeatedly abused by the same person. In Minne- sota, nearly 40 percent of abuse allegations to a statewide reporting sys- tem have alleged neglect by caregivers. Vulnerability can some- times increase with age. Americans are now living longer with chronic con- ditions like dementia or physical disabilities. The number of persons ages 85 and older is expected to double by the year 2030. One in ten older Americans Your Legal Rights By Lori Swanson Minnesota Attorney General report experiencing some form of maltreatment. Vulnerable Adults Act The Minnesota Vulner- able Adults Act is intend- ed to protect adults with physical, mental, or emo- tional disabilities. The Act requires the reporting of suspected maltreatment of vulnerable adults, re- quires investigation of the reports, and provides pro- tective and counseling ser- vices in appropriate cases. When a report of sus- pected maltreatment is made under the Act, the vulnerable adult has a right to be notified of any determinations of wheth- er maltreatment occurred and to receive a written report of the final deter- mination. If the vulnerable adult disagrees with the determination, the vulner- able adult has a right to request the investigating agency to reconsider the final determination, or to appeal the determination to a statewide Vulnerable Adult Maltreatment Re- view Panel. Reporting Abuse Vulnerable adults may have difficulty reporting these crimes to law en- forcement due to a variety of factors, including a lack of awareness that a crime has occurred, limited com- munication abilities, social isolation, dependence on the perpetrator, or fear of retaliation. This makes it especially important for members of the public to provide "tips" to stop harm to vulnerable adults. Previously in Minnesota there were 150 county- based systems for report- ing crimes against vul- nerable adults. In 2015, however, the Minnesota Legislature created a statewide hotline for peo- ple to report mistreatment of vulnerable adults. The hotline is called the Min- nesota Adult Abuse Re- porting Center (MAARC). MAARC is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and can be reached as fol- lows: Minnesota Adult Abuse Reporting Center Toll-free: (844) 880- 1574; Email: dhs.adultpro- tection@state.mn.us The MAARC is respon- sible for: Immediately notifying county social services if a vulnerable adult needs im- mediate adult protective services. Immediately notifying law enforcement of any report of suspected mal- treatment in which there is reason to believe a crime has been committed. Referring reports of suspected maltreatment to the lead investigative agency for responding to the report, which may include county and adult protection or reports to state agencies such as the Minnesota Department of Health or the Minnesota Department of Human Services. Licensed Facilities In addition, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living facilities and home health agencies are regu- lated and licensed by the Minnesota Department of Health. If MDH receives a complaint regarding the medical care or treatment of a patient, it has the au- thority to conduct an in- vestigation of the incident. The Office of Health Fa- cility Complaints (OHFC) is the division within the MDH charged with con- ducting the investigations. You may contact the OHFC at: Minnesota Department of Health, Office of Health Facility Complaints, 300 Golden Rule Building, P.O. Box 64970, St. Paul, MN 55164-0970; Ph. (651) 201-4201, Toll-free: (800) 369-7994; Email: health. ohfc-complaints@state. mn.us Conclusion Vulnerable adults are not always able to advo- cate for themselves. It is important for people who see abuse to report it. The Vulnerable Adults Act provides immunity from civil or criminal liability to anyone who makes a good faith report of abuse. Good Samaritans can make all the difference. FIND US ON FACEBOOK The support you need to find quality SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS A Place for Mom has helped over one million families find senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. CALL (844) 347-2104 ! We're paid by our partner communities aPlaceforMom. View all driving opportunities at www.schneiderjobs.com Apply online or contact Bryan Schafer with questions 800-558-1159 schaferb@schneider.com